This document describes Moonraker's full configuration. By default Mooonraker loads the configuration file from ~/moonraker.conf, however prebuilt images such as MainsailOS and FluiddPi configure Moonraker to load the configuration from ~/klipper_config/moonraker.conf.

As this document references configuration for both Klipper (printer.cfg) and Moonraker (moonraker.conf), each example contains a comment indicating which configuration file is being referenced A basic sample configuration in the docs directory.

Moonraker uses an ini style configuration very close to that of Klipper. Inline comments are supported, prefixed by either a # or ;. If it is necessary to use one of those characters in an option, they may be escaped using backslash, ie \#. For example:

# This is a comment
[section_name] # This is a comment
opt: \# This is not a comment

Moonraker uses strict parsing rules. A configuration file may not contain multiple sections of the same name. A section may not contain multiple options of the same name. However, configuration files included using include directives may contain sections specified in other files, and those sections may contain options specified in other files.

Core Components

Moonraker's core components are always loaded regardless of configuration.

[server]

The [server] section provides essential configuration for Moonraker. This section is required.


# moonraker.conf

[server]
host: 0.0.0.0
#  The host address in which to bind the HTTP server.  Default is to bind
#  to all interfaces
port: 7125
#   The port the HTTP server will listen on.  Default is 7125
ssl_port: 7130
#   The port to listen on for SSL (HTTPS) connections.  Note that the HTTPS
#   server will only be started of the certificate and key options outlined
#   below are provided.  The default is 7130.
ssl_certificate_path:
#   The path to a self signed ssl certificate.  The default is no path, which
#   disables HTTPS.
ssl_key_path:
#   The path to the private key used to signed the certificate.  The default
#   is no path, which disables HTTPS.
klippy_uds_address: /tmp/klippy_uds
#   The address of Unix Domain Socket used to communicate with Klippy. Default
#   is /tmp/klippy_uds
max_upload_size: 1024
#   The maximum size allowed for a file upload (in MiB).  Default is 1024 MiB.
enable_debug_logging: False
#   When set to True Moonraker will log in verbose mode.  During this stage
#   of development the default is False.

[file_manager]

The file_manager section provides configuration for Moonraker's file management functionality. If omitted defaults will be used.

# moonraker.conf

config_path:
#   The path to a directory where configuration files are located. This
#   directory may contain Klipper config files (printer.cfg) or Moonraker
#   config files (moonraker.conf).  Clients may also write their own config
#   files to this directory.  Note that this may not be the system root
#   (ie: "/") and moonraker must have read and write access permissions
#   for this directory.
log_path:
#   An optional path to a directory where log files are located.  Users may
#   configure various applications to store logs here and Moonraker will serve
#   them at "/server/files/logs/*".  The default is no log paths.
queue_gcode_uploads: False
#   When set to True the file manager will add uploads to the job_queue when
#   the `start_print` flag has been set.  The default if False.
enable_object_processing: False
#   When set to True gcode files will be run through a "preprocessor"
#   during metadata extraction if object tags are detected.  This preprocessor
#   replaces object tags with G-Code commands compatible with Klipper's
#   "cancel object" functionality.  Note that this process is file I/O intensive,
#   it is not recommended for usage on low resource SBCs such as a Pi Zero.
#   The default is False.

Warning

Moonraker currently supports two paths with read/write access, the config_path configured in the file_manager and the virtual_sdcard path configured through Klipper in printer.cfg. These paths are monitored for changes, thus they must not overlap. Likewise, these paths may not be a parent or child of folders containing sensitive files such as the database, Moonraker's source, or Klipper's source. If either of the above conditions are present Moonraker will generate a warning and revoke access to the offending path.

Tip

It is also possible to enable object processing directly in the slicer. See the preprocess-cancellation documentation for details.

[machine]

The machine section provides configuration for Moonraker's machine component, which is responsible for for collecting "machine" (ie: PC, SBC, etc) data and communicating with system services such as systemd.

# moonraker.conf
[machine]
provider: systemd_dbus
#   The provider implementation used to collect system service information
#   and run service actions (ie: start, restart, stop).  This can be "none",
#   "systemd_dbus", or "systemd_cli".  If the provider is set to "none" service
#   action APIs will be disabled.  The default is systemd_dbus.

Note

See the install documentation for details on PolicyKit permissions when using the DBus provider.

Warning

Some distributions (ie: DietPi) disable and mask the systemd-logind service. This service is necessary for the DBus provider to issue reboot and shutdown commands. In this scenario, Moonraker will fall back to CLI based reboot and shutdown commands. These commands require that Moonraker be able to run sudo commands without a password. Alternatively it may be possible to enable the systemd-logind service, consult with your distributions's documentation.

Reboot / Shutdown from Klipper

It is possible to call the shutdown_machine and reboot_machine remote methods from a gcode macro in Klipper. For example:

# printer.cfg

[gcode_macro SHUTDOWN]
gcode:
  {action_call_remote_method("shutdown_machine")}

[gcode_macro REBOOT]
gcode:
  {action_call_remote_method("reboot_machine")}

[database]

The database section provides configuration for Moonraker's lmdb database. If omitted defaults will be used.

moonraker.conf

database_path: ~/.moonraker_database
#   The path to the folder that stores Moonraker's lmdb database files.
#   It is NOT recommended to place this file in a location that is served by
#   Moonraker (such as the "config_path" or the location where gcode
#   files are stored).  If the folder does not exist an attempt will be made
#   to create it.  The default is ~/.moonraker_database.

Note

Previously the enable_database_debug option was available for internal development to test changes to write protected namespaces. This option been deprecated and disabled.

[data_store]

The data_store section provides configuration for Moonraker's volatile data store. Note that this is different from the database, as it stores data in memory and does not persist between restarts. If omitted defaults will be used.

# moonraker.conf

temperature_store_size: 1200
#   The maximum number of temperature values to store for each sensor. Note
#   that this value also applies to the "target", "power", and "fan_speed"
#   if the sensor reports them.  The default is 1200, which is enough to
#   store approximately 20 minutes of data at one value per second.
gcode_store_size:  1000
#   The maximum number "gcode lines" to store.  The default is 1000.

[job_queue]

The job_queue section provides configuration for Moonraker's gcode job queuing. If omitted defaults will be used.

# moonraker.conf

load_on_startup: False
#   When set to true the job queue will attempt to load the next
#   pending job when Klipper reports as "Ready".  If the queue has
#   been paused it will automatically resume.  Note that neither
#   the job_transition_delay nor the job_transition_gcode are
#   applied in this case.  The default is False.
automatic_transition: False
#   When set to True the queue will automatically transition to
#   the next job in the queue after the current job is complete.
#   This is useful for belt printers and other machines with the
#   ability to automate clearing of the build area.  When False
#   the queue will be paused after each job is loaded, requiring
#   that users manually resume to load the next print.  The default
#   is False.
job_transition_delay:
#   The amount of time to delay after completion of a job before
#   loading the next job on the queue.  The default is no delay.
job_transition_gcode:
#   A gcode to execute after the completion of a job before the next
#   job is loaded.  If a "job_transition_delay" has been configured
#   this gcode will run after the delay.  The default is no gcode.

[announcements]

The announcements section provides supplemental configuration for Moonraker announcements. If omitted defaults will be used.

# moonraker.conf

[announcements]
subscriptions:
#   A newline separated list announcement "subscriptions".  Generally
#   this would refer to specific clients that are registered to provide
#   announcements.  All items specified here are added in addition to
#   "moonraker" and "klipper", which are always subscribed to.  The default
#   is no additional subscriptions.
dev_mode: False
#   A developer option that fetches RSS announcements from a local folder when
#   set to True. The default behavior is for Moonraker to retrieve announcements
#   from RSS feeds generated by the "moonlight" repo on GitHub.

[webcam]

The webcam module provides unified webcam configuration management. Webcams may be configured directly through front-ends and added to the database, however it is also possible for users to configure one or more webcams in moonraker.conf. If a webcam is configured in moonraker.conf it takes precedent over a webcam in the database by the same name. The options available may not apply to all front-ends, refer to your front-end's documentation for details on camera configuration.

[webcam my_camera_name]
location: printer
#   A description of the webcam location, ie: what the webcam is observing.
#   The default is "printer".
service: mjpegstreamer
#   The name of the application or service hosting the webcam stream.  Front-
#   ends may use this configuration to determine how to launch or start the
#   program.  The default is "mjpegstreamer".
target_fps: 15
#   An integer value specifying the target framerate.  The default is 15 fps.
stream_url:
#   The url for the camera stream request.  This may be a full url or a
#   relative path (ie: /webcam?action=stream) if the stream is served on the
#   same host as Moonraker at port 80.  This parameter must be provided.
snapshot_url:
#   The url for the camera snapshot request.  This may be a full url or a
#   relative path (ie: /webcam?action=stream) if the stream is served on the
#   same host as Moonraker at port 80.  This parameter must be provided.
flip_horizontal: False
#   A boolean value indicating whether the stream should be flipped
#   horizontally.  The default is false.
flip_vertical: False
#   A boolean value indicating whether the stream should be flipped
#   vertically.  The default is false.
rotation: 0
#   An integer value indicating the amount of clockwise rotation to apply
#   to the stream.  May be 0, 90, 180, or 270.  The default is 0.

Optional Components

Optional Components are only loaded if present in moonraker.conf. This includes components that may not have any configuration.

[authorization]

The [authorization] section provides configuration for Moonraker's authorization module.

# moonraker.conf

[authorization]
login_timeout:
#   The time, in days, after which a user is forced to re-enter their
#   credentials to log in.  This period begins when a logged out user
#   first logs in.  Successive logins without logging out will not
#   renew the timeout.  The default is 90 days.
trusted_clients:
 192.168.1.30
 192.168.1.0/24
 my-printer.lan
#   A list of newline separated ip addresses, ip ranges, or fully qualified
#   domain names that are trusted. Trusted clients are given full access to
#   the API.  Both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses and ranges are supported. Ranges
#   must be expressed in CIDR notation (see http://ip.sb/cidr for more info).
#   For example, an entry of 192.168.1.0/24 will authorize IPs in the range of
#   192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.254.  Note that when specifying IPv4 ranges the
#   last segment of the ip address must be 0. The default is no clients are
#   trusted.
cors_domains:
  http://klipper-printer.local
  http://second-printer.local:7125
#   Enables CORS for the specified domains.  One may specify * if they wish
#   to allow all domains, however this should be an option reserved for
#   client developers and not used in production.  A * can also be used
#   to specify a wildcard that matches several domains.  For example:
#     *.local
#     http://*.my-domain.com
#     *.my-domain.com:*
#   Are all valid entries.  However, a wildcard may not be specified in
#   the top level domain:
#      http://my-printer.*
#   The above example will be rejected.
#   When CORS is enabled by adding an entry to this option, all origins
#   matching the "trusted_clients" option will have CORS headers set as
#   well.  If this option is not specified then CORS is disabled.
force_logins: False
#   When set to True a user login is required for authorization if at least
#   one user has been created, overriding the "trusted_clients" configuration.
#   If no users have been created then trusted client checks will apply.
#   The default is False.
default_source: moonraker
#   The default source used to authenticate user logins. Can be "ldap" or
#   "moonraker"  The default is "moonraker".

[ldap]

The ldap module may be used by [authorization] to perform user authentication though an ldap server.

# moonraker.conf

[ldap]
ldap_host: ldap.local
#   The host address of the LDAP server.  This parameter must be provided
ldap_port:
#   The LDAP server's port.  The default is 389 for standard connections
#   and 636 for SSL/TLS connections.
ldap_secure: True
#   Enables LDAP over SSL/TLS. The default is False.
base_dn: DC=ldap,DC=local
#   The base distinguished name used to search for users on the server.
#   This option accepts Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for details.
#   This parameter must be provided.
bind_dn: {secrets.ldap_credentials.bind_dn}
#   The distinguished name for bind authentication.  For example:
#       CN=moonraker,OU=Users,DC=ldap,DC=local
#   This option accepts Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for
#   details.  By default the ldap client will attempt to bind anonymously.
bind_password: {secrets.ldap_credentials.bind_password}
#   The password for bind authentication. This option accepts Jinja2 Templates,
#   see the [secrets] section for details.  This parameter must be provided
#   if a "bind_dn" is specified, otherwise it must be omitted.
group_dn: CN=moonraker,OU=Groups,DC=ldap,DC=local
#   A group distinguished name in which the user must be a member of to pass
#   authentication.  This option accepts Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets]
#   section for details. The default is no group requirement.
is_active_directory: True
#   Enables support for Microsoft Active Directory.  The default is False.

[octoprint_compat]

Enables partial support of OctoPrint API is implemented with the purpose of allowing uploading of sliced prints to a moonraker instance. Currently we support Slic3r derivatives and Cura with Cura-OctoPrint.

# moonraker.conf

[octoprint_compat]
enable_ufp: True
#   When set to True the octoprint_compat module will report that the UFP
#   plugin is available.  If the installed version of Cura supports UFP
#   files will be uploaded in UFP format.  When set to False Cura will
#   upload files in .gcode format.  This setting has no impact on other
#   slicers.  The default is True.

flip_h: False
#   Set the webcam horizontal flip.  The default is False.
flip_v: False
#   Set the webcam vertical flip.  The default is False.
rotate_90: False
#   Set the webcam rotation by 90 degrees.  The default is False.
stream_url: /webcam/?action=stream
#   The URL to use for streaming the webcam.  It can be set to an absolute
#   URL if needed. In order to get the webcam to work in Cura through
#   an OctoPrint connection, you can set this value to
#   http://<octoprint ip>/webcam/?action=stream.  The default value is
#   /webcam/?action=stream.
webcam_enabled: True
#   Enables the webcam.  The default is True.

Tip

It is possible to embed "Prusa" style thumbnails in .gcode files using the latest version of Cura. Select Extensions -> Post Processing -> Modify G-Code. In the dialog click the Add a script button and select Create Thumbnail. Change the width and height (most Moonraker clients handle 300x300 well) then click close. A single large thumbnail is all that is necessary, Moonraker will generate a smaller 32x32 thumbnail from it. This is convenient for users who do not wish to upload in UFP format.

[history]

Enables print history tracking.

# moonraker.conf

[history]

[paneldue]

Enables PanelDue display support. The PanelDue should be connected to the host machine, either via the machine's UART GPIOs or through a USB-TTL converter. Currently PanelDue Firmware Version 1.24 is supported. Other releases may not behave correctly.

# moonraker.conf

[paneldue]
serial:
#   The serial port in which the PanelDue is connected.  This parameter
#   must be provided.
baud: 57600
#   The baud rate to connect at.  The default is 57600 baud.
machine_name: Klipper
#   An optional unique machine name which displays on the PanelDue's
#   Header.  The default is "Klipper".
macros:
 LOAD_FILAMENT
 UNLOAD_FILAMENT
 PANELDUE_BEEP FREQUENCY=500 DURATION=1
#   A list of newline separated "macros" that are displayed in the
#   PanelDue's "macros" tab.  These can be gcode macros or simple
#   gcodes.  A macro may contain parameters.  The default is no
#   macros will be displayed by the PanelDue.
confirmed_macros:
  RESTART
  FIRMWARE_RESTART
#  Like the "macros" option, this list is added to the macros tab.
#  When one of these macros is executed the PanelDue will prompt
#  the user with a confirmation dialog.  The default is to include
#  RESTART and FIRMWARE_RESTART.

Most options above are self explanatory. The "macros" option can be used to specify commands (either built in or gcode_macros) that will show up in the PanelDue's "macro" menu.

Note that buzzing the piezo requires the following gcode_macro in printer.cfg:

# printer.cfg

[gcode_macro PANELDUE_BEEP]
# Beep frequency
default_parameter_FREQUENCY: 300
# Beep duration in seconds
default_parameter_DURATION: 1.
gcode:
  {action_call_remote_method("paneldue_beep",
                             frequency=FREQUENCY|int,
                             duration=DURATION|float)}

[power]

Enables device power control. Multiple "power" devices may be configured, each with their own section, ie: [power my_printer], [power my_led].

Options common to all power devices

The following configuration options are available for all power device types:

# moonraker.conf

[power device_name]
type:
#   The type of device.  Can be either gpio, klipper_device, rf,
#   tplink_smartplug, tasmota, shelly, homeseer, homeassistant, loxonev1,
#   smartthings, mqtt or hue.
#   This parameter must be provided.
off_when_shutdown: False
#   If set to True the device will be powered off when Klipper enters
#   the "shutdown" state.  This option applies to all device types.
#   The default is False.
off_when_shutdown_delay: 0
#   If "off_when_shutdown" is set, this option specifies the amount of time
#   (in seconds) to wait before turning the device off. Default is 0 seconds.
on_when_job_queued: False
#   If set to True the device will power on if a job is queued while the
#   device is off.  This allows for an automated "upload, power on, and
#   print" approach directly from the slicer, see the configuration example
#   below for details. The default is False.
locked_while_printing: False
#   If True, locks the device so that the power cannot be changed while the
#   printer is printing. This is useful to avert an accidental shutdown to
#   the printer's power.  The default is False.
restart_klipper_when_powered: False
#   If set to True, Moonraker will schedule a "FIRMWARE_RESTART" to command
#   after the device has been powered on. If it isn't possible to immediately
#   schedule a firmware restart (ie: Klippy is disconnected), the restart
#   will be postponed until Klippy reconnects and reports that startup is
#   complete.  Prior to scheduling the restart command the power device will
#   always check Klippy's state.  If Klippy reports that it is "ready", the
#   FIRMWARE_RESTART will be aborted as unnecessary.
#   The default is False.
restart_delay: 1.
#   If "restart_klipper_when_powered" is set, this option specifies the amount
#   of time (in seconds) to delay the restart.  Default is 1 second.
bound_service:
#   Can be set to any service Moonraker is authorized to manage with the
#   exception of the moonraker service itself. See the tip below this section
#   for details on what services are authorized.  When a bound service has
#   been set the service will be started when the device powers on and stopped
#   when the device powers off.  The default is no service is bound to the
#   device.

Tip

Moonraker is authorized to manage the klipper, klipper_mcu, webcamd, MoonCord, KlipperScreen, and moonraker-telegram-bot services. It can also manage multiple instances of a service, ie: klipper_1, klipper_2. Keep in mind that service names are case sensitive.

Note

If a device has been bound to the klipper service and the restart_klipper_when_powered option is set to True, the restart will be scheduled to execute after Klipper reports that its startup sequence is complete.

GPIO Device Configuration

The following options are available for gpio device types:

# moonraker.conf

pin: gpiochip0/gpio26
#   The pin to use for GPIO and RF devices.  The chip is optional, if left out
#   then the module will default to gpiochip0.  If one wishes to invert
#   the signal, a "!" may be prefixed to the pin.  Valid examples:
#      gpiochip0/gpio26
#      gpio26
#      !gpiochip0/gpio26
#      !gpio26
#    This parameter must be provided for "gpio" type devices
initial_state: off
#    The initial state for GPIO type devices.  May be on or
#    off.  When moonraker starts the device will be set to this
#    state.  Default is off.
timer:
#    A time (in seconds) after which the device will power off after being.
#    switched on. This effectively turns the device into a  momentary switch.
#    This option is available for gpio, klipper_device, tplink_smartplug,
#    shelly, and tasmota devices.  The timer may be a floating point value
#    for gpio types, it should be an integer for all other types.  The
#    default is no timer is set.

Examples:

# moonraker.conf

# Control a relay providing power to the printer
[power printer]
type: gpio
pin: gpio26  # uses pin 26 on gpiochip0
off_when_shutdown: True
initial_state: off

# Control a status led
[power printer_led]
type: gpio
pin: !gpiochip0/gpio16  # inverts pin
initial_state: off

# Control a printer illumination, powers on when
# Moonraker starts
[power light_strip]
type: gpio
pin: gpiochip0/gpio17
initial_state: on

Klipper Device Configuration

The following options are available for klipper_device device types:

# moonraker.conf

object_name: output_pin my_pin
#    The Klipper object_name (as defined in your Klipper config).  Valid examples:
#      output_pin my_pin
#      gcode_macro MY_MACRO
#    Currently, only `output_pin` and `gcode_macro` Klipper devices are
#    supported.  See the note below for macro restrictions. Keep in mind that
#    the object name is case sensitive.  This parameter must be provided.
timer:
#    A time (in seconds) after which the device will power off after being.
#    switched on. This effectively turns the device into a  momentary switch.
#    This option is available for gpio, klipper_device, tplink_smartplug,
#    shelly, and tasmota devices.  The timer may be a floating point value
#    for gpio types, it should be an integer for all other types.  The
#    default is no timer is set.

Warning

Klipper devices cannot be used to toggle the printer's power supply as they require that Klipper be running and in the "Ready" state.

Note

Some of the options common to all [power] devices are not available for the klipper_device type. Specifically off_when_shutdown and restart_klipper_when_powered may not be configured. The bound_service option is restricted, it may not be set to an instance of klipper or klipper_mcu.

Gcode Macro Restrictions

To control "gcode_macro" klipper devices, macros must be configured to accept a VALUE parameter, and they must report and update a value variable. The value should be 1 when the device is on, and 0 when the device is off. For example, a macro could be configured like the following in printer.cfg:

# printer.cfg

# Assume we have a neopixel we want to control
[neopixel extruder_flare]
pin: PA13

[gcode_macro SET_FLARE]
# The variable below should be initialized to the startup value.  If your
# device is configured to be on at startup use "variable_value: 1"
variable_value: 0
  {% if 'VALUE' not in params %}
    {action_raise_error("Parameter 'VALUE' missing from 'SET_FLARE'")}
  {% endif %}
  {% set state = params.VALUE %}
  {% if state %}
    # turn the neopixel on
    SET_LED LED=extruder_flare RED=0.75 BLUE=0.2 GREEN=0.2 SYNC=0
  {% else %}
    # turn the neopixel off
    SET_LED LED=extruder_flare RED=0 BLUE=0 GREEN=0 SYNC=0
  {% endif %}
  # Update the state of our variable.  This will inform Moonraker that
  # the device has changed its state.
  SET_GCODE_VARIABLE MACRO=SET_FLARE VARIABLE=value value={state}

This can be controlled via Moonraker with the following in moonraker.conf:

# moonraker.conf

[power flare]
type: klipper_device
object_name: gcode_macro SET_FLARE
# The option below locks out requests to toggle the flare
# when Klipper is printing, however it cannot prevent a
# direct call to the SET_FLARE gcode macro.
locked_while_printing: True

Output Pin Example:

# moonraker.conf

# Control a relay providing power to the printer
[power my_pin]
type: klipper_device
object_name: output_pin my_pin

Tip

If you need to use pwm you can wrap the call to SET_PIN in a gcode_macro and configure Moonraker to toggle the Macro rather than the pin directly.

RF Device Configuration

The following options are available for gpio controlled rf device types:

# moonraker.conf

pin: gpiochip0/gpio26
#   The pin to use for GPIO and RF devices.  The chip is optional, if left out
#   then the module will default to gpiochip0.  If one wishes to invert
#   the signal, a "!" may be prefixed to the pin.  Valid examples:
#      gpiochip0/gpio26
#      gpio26
#      !gpiochip0/gpio26
#      !gpio26
#    This parameter must be provided for "gpio" type devices
initial_state: off
#    The initial state for GPIO type devices.  May be on or
#    off.  When moonraker starts the device will be set to this
#    state.  Default is off.
timer:
#    A time (in seconds) after which the device will power off after being.
#    switched on. This effectively turns the device into a  momentary switch.
#    This option is available for gpio, klipper_device, tplink_smartplug,
#    shelly, and tasmota devices.  The timer may be a floating point value
#    for gpio types, it should be an integer for all other types.  The
#    default is no timer is set.
on_code:
off_code:
#   Valid binary codes that are sent via the RF transmitter.
#   For example: 1011.

Warning

TPLink has removed access to the local API for some of its Kasa devices in recent firmware releases. As such, it is possible that Moonraker will be unable to communicate with your device. While TPLink claims that they will provide a new local API, they have have not done so as of December 22nd, 2021. See this TPLink forum post and this Home Assistant Alert for details.

The following options are available for tplink_smartplug device types:

# moonraker.conf

address:
#   A valid ip address or hostname for the tplink device.  For example:
#     192.168.1.127
#   This parameter must be provided.
port:
#   The port to connect to.  Default is 9999.
#
output_id:
#   For power strips, the socket index to use. Default is 0 which indicates the
#   device is not a power strip.

Example:

# moonraker.conf

[power printer_plug]
type: tplink_smartplug
address: 192.168.1.123

Tasmota Configuration

The following options are available for tasmota device types:

# moonraker.conf
#
#   Note:
#   If your single-relay Tasmota device switches on/off successfully,
#   but fails to report its state, ensure that 'SetOption26' is set in
#   Tasmota.
address:
#   A valid ip address or hostname for the tasmota device.  This parameter
#   must be provided.
password:
#   A password used to authenticate requests.  Default is no password.
output_id:
#   The output_id (or relay id) to use if the Tasmota device supports
#   more than one output.  Default is 1.

Note

This implementation communicates with Tasmota firmware through its HTTP APIs. It is also possible to use MQTT to control devices flashed with Tasmota.

Example:

# moonraker.conf

[power tasmota_plug]
type: tasmota
address: 192.168.1.124
password: mypassword

Shelly Configuration

The following options are available for shelly device types:

# moonraker.conf

address:
#   A valid ip address or hostname for the shelly device.  This parameter
#   must be provided.
user:
#   A user name to use for request authentication.  This option accepts
#   Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for details.  If no password
#   is set the the default is no user, otherwise the default is "admin".
password:
#   The password to use for request authentication.  This option accepts
#   Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for details. The default is no
#   password.
output_id:
#   The output_id (or relay id) to use if the Shelly device supports
#   more than one output.  Default is 1.

Note

This implementation communicates with Shelly firmware through its HTTP APIs. It is also possible to use MQTT to control Shelly devices.

Example:

# moonraker.conf

[power shelly_plug]
type: shelly
address: 192.168.1.125
user: user2
password: password2

Homeseer Configuration

The following options are available for homeseer device types:

# moonraker.conf

address:
#   A valid ip address or hostname for the homeseer device.  This parameter
#   must be provided.
device:
#   The ID of the device to control.
#   To find out the ID in the HomeSeer UI, click on the device you want to
#   control (Make sure to click the sub-device that actually has On/Off
#   buttons).  And then go to the "status/graphics" tab and it should list
#   "ID" in the "advanced information" section.  This parameter must be
#   provided.
user:
#   The user name for request authentication.  This option accepts
#   Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for details.  This
#   default is "admin".
password:
#   The password for request authentication.  This option accepts
#   Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for details. The
#   default is no password.
#

Home Assistant Configuration (HTTP)

The following options are available for homeassistant device types:

# moonraker.conf

address:
#   A valid ip address or hostname for the Home Assistant server.  This
#   parameter must be provided.
protocol:
#   The protocol for the URL to the Home Assistant server. Default is http.
port:
#   The port the Home Assistant server is listening on.  Default is 8123.
device:
#   The device ID of the switch to control. This parameter must be provided.
token:
#   A token used for request authorization.  This option accepts
#   Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for details. This parameter
#   must be provided.
domain:
#   The class of device managed by Home Assistant. Default is "switch".
status_delay: 1.0
#   The time (in seconds) to delay between requesting a device to turn
#   on/off and requesting its current status.  This is a workaround used
#   to validate that Home Assistant has successfully toggled the device,
#   as the API is currently broken on their end.  Default is 1 second.
#

Example:

# moonraker.conf

[power homeassistant_switch]
type: homeassistant
address: 192.168.1.126
port: 8123
device: switch.1234567890abcdefghij
token: home-assistant-very-long-token
domain: switch

Loxone Device Configuration

The following options are available for loxone device types:

# moonraker.conf

address:
#   A valid ip address or hostname for the Loxone server.  This
#   parameter must be provided.
user:
#   The user name used for request authorization.  This option accepts
#   Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for details. The default is
#   "admin".
password:
#   The password used for request authorization.  This option accepts
#   Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for details. The default
#   is "admin".
output_id:
#   The name of a programmed output, virtual input or virtual
#   output in the loxone configuration.  The default is no output id.
#

MQTT Device Configuration

The following options are available for mqtt device types:

# moonraker.conf

qos:
#  The MQTT QOS level to use when publishing and subscribing to topics.
#  The default is to use the setting supplied in the [mqtt] section.
command_topic:
#  The mqtt topic used to publish commands to the device.  This parameter must
#  be provided.
command_payload:
#  The payload sent with the topic.  This can be a template, with a "command"
#  variable included in the template context, where "command" is either "on"
#  or "off".  For example:
#    {% if command == "on" %}
#      TURN_ON
#    {% else %}
#      TURN_OFF
#    {% endif %}
#  The above example would resolve to "TURN_ON" if the request is turn the
#  the device on, and "TURN_OFF" if the request is to turn the device off.
#  This parameter must be provided.
retain_command_state:
#  If set to True the retain flag will be set when the command topic is
#  published.  Default is False.
state_topic:
#  The mqtt topic to subscribe to for state updates.  This parameter must be
#  provided.
state_response_template:
#  A template used to parse the payload received with the state topic.  A
#  "payload" variable is provided the template's context.  This template
#  must resolve to "on" or "off".  For example:
#    {% set resp = payload|fromjson %}
#    {resp["POWER"]}
#  The above example assumes a json response is received, with a "POWER" field
#  that set to either "ON" or "OFF".  The resolved response will always be
#  trimmed of whitespace and converted to lowercase. The default is the payload.
state_timeout:
#  The amount of time (in seconds) to wait for the state topic to receive an
#  update. If the timeout expires the device revert to an "error" state.  This
#  timeout is applied during initialization and after a command has been sent.
#  The default is 2 seconds.
query_topic:
#  The topic used to query command state.  It is expected that the device will
#  respond by publishing to the "state_topic".  This parameter is optional,
query_payload:
#  The payload to send with the query topic.  This may be a template or a string.
#  The default is no payload.
query_after_command:
#  If set to True Moonraker will publish the query topic after publishing the
#  command topic.  This should only be necessary if the device does not publish a
#  response to a command request to the state topic.  The default is False.

Note

Moonraker's MQTT client must be properly configured to add a MQTT device. See the mqtt section for details.

Tip

MQTT is the most robust way of managing networked devices through Moonraker. A well implemented MQTT device will publish all changes in state to the state_topic. Moonraker receives these changes, updates its internal state, and notifies connected clients. This allows for device control outside of Moonraker. Note however that post command actions, such as bound services, will not be run if a device is toggled outside of Moonraker.

Example:

# moonraker.conf

# Example configuration for ing with Tasmota firmware over mqtt
[power mqtt_plug]
type: mqtt
command_topic: cmnd/tasmota_switch/POWER
# Tasmota uses "on" and "off" as the payload, so our template simply renders
# the command
command_payload:
  {command}
# There is no need to set the retain flag for Tasmota devices.  Moonraker
# will use the query topic to initialize the device.  Tasmota will publish
# all changes in state to the state topic.
retain_command_state: False
# To query a tasmota device we send the command topic without a payload.
# Optionally we could send a "?" as the payload.
query_topic: cmnd/tasmota_switch/POWER
# query_payload: ?
state_topic: stat/tasmota_switch/POWER
# The response is either "ON" or "OFF".  Moonraker will handle converting to
# lower case.
state_response_template:
  {payload}
# Tasmota updates the state topic when the device state changes, so it is not
# not necessary to query after a command
query_after_command: False

SmartThings (HTTP)

Important

SmartThings Developer API Topics:

The following options are available for smartthings device types:

# moonraker.conf

address: api.smartthings.com
protocol: https
port: 443
token:
#   A token used for request authorization.  This option accepts
#   Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for details. This parameter
#   must be provided.
device:
#   The Device guid of the switch to control. This parameter must be provided.

Example:

# moonraker.conf

[power smartthings_switch]
type: smartthings
address: api.smartthings.com
protocol: https
port: 443
token: smartthings-bearer-token
device: smartthings-device-id

Hue Device Configuration

The following options are available for hue device types:

# moonraker.conf

address:
#   A valid ip address or hostname of the Philips Hue Bridge. This
#   parameter must be provided.
user:
#   The api key used for request authorization.  This option accepts
#   Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for details.
#   An explanation how to get the api key can be found here:
#   https://developers.meethue.com/develop/get-started-2/#so-lets-get-started
device_id:
#   The device id of the light/socket you want to control.
#   An explanation on how you could get the device id, can be found here:
#   https://developers.meethue.com/develop/get-started-2/#turning-a-light-on-and-off

Toggling device state from Klipper

It is possible to toggle device power from the Klippy host, this can be done with a gcode_macro, such as:

# printer.cfg

[gcode_macro POWER_OFF_PRINTER]
gcode:
  {action_call_remote_method("set_device_power",
                             device="printer",
                             state="off")}
The POWER_OFF_PRINTER gcode can be run to turn off the "printer" device. This could be used in conjunction with Klipper's idle timeout to turn the printer off when idle with a configuration similar to that of below:
# printer.cfg

[delayed_gcode delayed_printer_off]
initial_duration: 0.
gcode:
  {% if printer.idle_timeout.state == "Idle" %}
    POWER_OFF_PRINTER
  {% endif %}

[idle_timeout]
gcode:
  M84
  TURN_OFF_HEATERS
  UPDATE_DELAYED_GCODE ID=delayed_printer_off DURATION=60

Power on G-Code Uploads

To power on a device after an upload, queue_gcode_uploads: True must be set in the [file_manager], load_on_startup: True must be set in [job_queue] and one_when_job_queued: True must be set in [power dev_name], where "dev_name" the the name of your power device. For example:

# moonraker.conf

# Configure the file manager to queue uploaded files when the "start" flag
# is set and Klipper cannot immediately start the print.
[file_manager]
queue_gcode_uploads: True
# Set the config_path and log_path options to the correct locations
#config_path:
#log_path:

# Configure the Job Queue to start a queued print when Klipper reports as
# ready.
[job_queue]
load_on_startup: True
# Configure the job_transition_delay and job_transition_gcode options
# if desired.  Note that they do no apply to prints loaded on startup.

# Configure the "power" device to turn on when jobs are queued.
[power printer]
on_when_job_queued: True
# configure the type and any type specific options.  This example
# uses a gpio
#type: gpio
#pin: gpio26
#initial_state: off

With the above configuration options set, an upload with the "start" flag set to true will be queued. This "printer" device will be notified and powered on. Finally, the job_queue will load and start the queued print after Klipper reports itself as "ready".

Note

This procedure assumes that the printer is powered off when the gcode file is uploaded. It also assumes that the job_queue is empty, if any jobs exist in the queue then the next job on the queue will be loaded.

[update_manager]

This enables moonraker's update manager. Note that updates can only be performed on pristine git repos. Repos that have been modified on disk or cloned from unofficial sources are not supported.

# moonraker.conf

[update_manager]
enable_repo_debug: False
#   When set to True moonraker will bypass repo validation and allow
#   updates from unofficial remotes and/or branches.  Updates on
#   detached repos are also allowed.  This option is intended for
#   developers and should not be used on production machines.  The
#   default is False.
enable_auto_refresh: False
#   When set to True Moonraker will attempt to fetch status about
#   available updates roughly every 24 hours, between 12am-4am.
#   When set to False Moonraker will only fetch update state on startup
#   and clients will need to request that Moonraker updates state.  The
#   default is False.
refresh_interval: 672
#   The interval (in hours) after which the update manager will check
#   for new updates.  This interval is applies to updates for Moonraker,
#   Klipper, and System Packages, and is the default for all clients.
#   The default is 672 hours (28 days).
enable_system_updates: True
#   A boolean value that can be used to toggle system package updates.
#   Currently Moonraker only supports updating packages via APT, so
#   this option is useful for users that wish to experiment with linux
#   distros that use other package management applications, or users
#   that prefer to manage their packages directly.  Note that if this
#   is set to False users will be need to make sure that all system
#   dependencies are up to date.  The default is True.
enable_packagekit: True
#   This option is available when system updates are enabled via the
#   "enable_system_updates" option.  When set to True, system package
#   updates will be processed via PackageKit over D-Bus.  When set to False
#   the "apt cli" fallback will be used.  The default is True.
channel: dev
#   The update channel applied to Klipper and Moonraker.  May dev or
#   beta.  The dev channel will update to the latest commit pushed
#   to the repo, whereas the beta channel will update to the latest
#   commit tagged by Moonraker.  The beta channel will see less frequent
#   updates and should be more stable.  Users on the beta channel will have
#   more opportunity to review breaking changes before choosing to update.
#   The default is dev.

Extension Configuration

The update manager may be configured manage additional software, henceforth referred to as "extensions". In general terms, an extension may be defined as a piece of software hosted on GitHub. The update manager breaks this down into 3 basic types:

  • web: A front-end such as Mainsail or Fluidd. Updates are deployed via zip files created for GitHub releases.
  • git_repo: Used to manage extensions that do not fall into the "web" type. Updates are deployed directly via git. Typical usage scenarios are to manage extensions installed a service such as KlipperScreen, repos containing configuration, and unofficial 3rd party extensions for Klipper and Moonraker. See the note below in reference to unofficial extensions.
  • zip: This can be used to managed various extensions like the git_repo type, however its updates are deployed via zipped GitHub releases.

Note

To benefit the community Moonraker facilitates updates for 3rd party "Klippy Extras" and "Moonraker Components". While many of these extensions are well developed and tested, users should always be careful when using such extensions. Moonraker and Klipper provide no official support for such extensions, thus users experiencing an issue should not create bug reports on the Klipper or Moonraker issue trackers without first reproducing the issue with all unofficial extensions disabled.

Web type (front-end) configuration
# moonraker.conf

[update_manager extension_name]
type: web
#   The management type.  This should always be "web" for browser based
#   front-ends. This parameter must be provided.
channel: stable
#   May be stable or beta.  When beta is specified "pre-release"
#   updates are available.
repo:
#   This is the GitHub repo of the front-end, in the format of owner/repo_name.
#   For example, this could be set to fluidd-core/fluidd to update Fluidd or
#   mainsail-crew/mainsail to update Mainsail.  This parameter must be provided.
path:
#   The path to the front-end's files on disk.  This parameter must be provided.
persistent_files:
#   A list of newline separated file names that should persist between
#   updates.  This is useful for static configuration files, or perhaps
#   themes.  The default is no persistent files.
refresh_interval:
#   This overrides the refresh_interval set in the primary [update_manager]
#   section.
info_tags:
#   Optional information tags about this extensions that are reported via
#   Moonraker's API as a list of strings. Each tag should be separated by
#   a new line. For example:
#       info_tags:
#           desc=My Client App
#           action=webcam_restart
#   Front-ends may use these tags to perform additional actions or display
#   information, see your extension documentation for details on configuration.
#   The default is an empty list.
All other extensions

Note

Git repos must have at least one tag for Moonraker to identify its version. The tag may be lightweight or annotated. The tag must be in semantic version format, vX.Y.Z, where X, Y, and Z are all unsigned integer values. For example, a repos first tag might be v0.0.1.

# moonraker.conf

# When defining a service, the "extension_name" must be the name of the
# systemd service
[update_manager extension_name]
type: git_repo
#   Can be git_repo or zip.  This value is set depending on how an extension
#   chooses to deploy updates, see its documentation for details  This
#   parameter must be provided.
channel: dev
#   The update channel.  The available value differs depending on the
#   "type" option.
#      type: git_repo - May be dev or beta.  The dev channel will update to
#                       the latest pushed commit, whereas the beta channel
#                       will update to the latest tagged commit.
#      type: zip      - May be be stable or beta.  When beta is specified
#                       "pre-release" updates are available.
#   The default is dev.
path:
#   The absolute path to the client's files on disk. This parameter must be
#   provided.
#   Example:
#     path: ~/service_name
origin:
#   The full git URL of the "origin" remote for the repository.  This can
#   be be viewed by navigating to your repository and running:
#     git remote -v
#   This parameter must be provided.
primary_branch:
#   The name of the primary branch used for release code on this repo.  This
#   option allows clients to specify 'main', or their own unique name, as
#   the branch used for repo validity checks.  The default is master.
env:
#   The path to the extension's virtual environment executable on disk.  For
#   example, Moonraker's venv is located at ~/moonraker-env/bin/python.
#   The default is no env, which disables updating python packages.
requirements:
#  This is the location in the repository to the extension's python
#  requirements file. This location is relative to the root of the repository.
#  This parameter must be provided if the "env" option is set, otherwise it
#  should be omitted.
install_script:
#  The file location, relative to the repository, for the installation script.
#  The update manager parses this file for "system" packages that need updating.
#  The default is no install script, which disables system package updates
enable_node_updates:
#   When set to True, Moonraker will assume that this repo relies upon node
#   and will attempt to execute "npm ci --only=prod" when it detects a change
#   to package-lock.json.  Note that if your project does not have a
#   package-lock.json in its root directory then the plugin will fail to load.
#   Default is False.
host_repo:
#   The GitHub repo in which zipped releases are hosted.  Note that this does
#   not need to match the repository in the "origin" option, as it is possible
#   to use a central GitHub repository to host multiple extension builds.  As
#   an example, Moonraker's repo hosts builds for both Moonraker and Klipper.
#   This option defaults to the repo extracted from the "origin" option,
#   however if the origin is not hosted on GitHub then this parameter must
#   be provided.
is_system_service: True
#   This should be set to False for repos that are not installed as a service
#   or do not need to restart a service after updates. This option sets the
#   default value for the "managed_services" option.  When set to False,
#   "managed_services" defaults to an empty list.  When set to True,
#   "managed_services" defaults to a list containing a single item, a service
#   matching the "extension_name" provided in the section header. The default
#   is True.
#   NOTE: In the future this option will be deprecated.  In preparation
#   for this, extensions that are installed as service, such as "KlipperScreen"
#   should ignore this option and set the "managed_services" option.
managed_services:
#   A list of one or more systemd services that must be restarted after an
#   update is complete.  Multiple services must be separated by whitespace.
#   Currently this option is restricted to the following values:
#       <name>    - The name configured in the extension's section header.
#                   If the section header is [update_manager KlipperScreen]
#                   then KlipperScreen would be a valid value.
#       klipper   - The klipper service will be restarted after an update
#       moonraker - The moonraker service will be restarted after an update
#   When this option is specified it overrides the "is_system_service" option.
#   Thus it is not required to specify both, only one or the other.  The
#   default depends on "is_system_service" as explained above.
refresh_interval:
#   This overrides the refresh_interval set in the primary [update_manager]
#   section.
info_tags:
#   Optional information tags about this application that will be reported
#   front-ends as a list of strings. Each tag should be separated by a new line.
#   For example:
#       info_tags:
#           desc=Special Application
#   Front-ends my use these tags to perform additional actions or display
#   information, see your extension documentation for details on configuration.
#   The default is an empty list.

[mqtt]

Enables an MQTT Client. When configured most of Moonraker's APIs are available by publishing JSON-RPC requests to {instance_name}/moonraker/api/request. Responses will be published to {instance_name}/moonraker/api/response. See the API Documentation for details on on JSON-RPC.

It is also possible for other components within Moonraker to use MQTT to publish and subscribe to topics.

# moonraker.conf

[mqtt]
address:
#   Address of the Broker.  This may be a hostname or IP Address.  This
#   parameter must be provided.
port:
#   Port the Broker is listening on.  Default is 1883.
username:
#   An optional username used to log in to the Broker.  This option accepts
#   Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for details. The default is
#   no username (an anonymous login will be attempted).
password:
#   An optional password used to log in to the Broker.  This option accepts
#   Jinja2 Templates, see the [secrets] section for details.  The default is
#   no password.
password_file:
#   *** DEPRECATED - Use the "password" option ***
#   An optional path to a text file containing a password used to log in
#   to the broker.  It is strongly recommended that this file be located
#   in a folder not served by Moonraker.  It is also recommended that the
#   password be unique and not used for other logins, as it is stored in
#   plain text.  To create a password file, one may ssh in to the device
#   and enter the following commands:
#      cd ~
#      echo mypassword > .mqttpass
#   Then set this option to:
#     ~/.mqttpass
#   If this option is omitted no password will be used to login.
mqtt_protocol: v3.1.1
#   The protocol to use when connecting to the Broker.  May be v3.1,
#   v3.1.1, and v5.  The default is v3.1.1
enable_moonraker_api: True
#   If set to true the MQTT client will subscribe to API topic, ie:
#     {instance_name}/moonraker/api/request
#   This can be set to False if the user does not wish to allow API
#   requests over MQTT.  The default is True.
instance_name:
#   An identifier used to create unique API topics for each instance of
#   Moonraker on network.  This name cannot contain wildcards (+ or #).
#   For example, if the instance name is set to my_printer, Moonraker
#   will subscribe to the following topic for API requests:
#     my_printer/moonraker/api/request
#   Responses will be published to the following topic:
#     my_printer/moonraker/api/response
#   The default is the machine's hostname.
status_objects:
#   A newline separated list of Klipper objects whose state will be
#   published in the payload of the following topic:
#      {instance_name}/klipper/status
#   For example, this option could be set as follows:
#
#     status_objects:
#       webhooks
#       toolhead=position,print_time,homed_axes
#       extruder=temperature
#
#   In the example above, all fields of the "webhooks" object will be tracked
#   and changes will be published.  Only the "position", "print_time", and
#   "homed_axes" fields of the "toolhead" will be tracked.  Likewise, only the
#   "temperature" field of the extruder will be tracked. See the
#   "Printer Objects" section of the documentation for an overview of the most
#   common objects available.
#
#   Note that Klipper will only push an update to an object/field if the field
#   has changed.  An object with no fields that have changed will not be part
#   of the payload.  Object state is checked and published roughly every 250 ms.
#
#   If not configured then no objects will be tracked and published to
#   the klipper/status topic.
default_qos: 0
#   The default QOS level used when publishing or subscribing to topics.
#   Must be an integer value from 0 to 2.  The default is 0.
api_qos:
#   The QOS level to use for the API topics. If not provided, the
#   value specified by "default_qos" will be used.

Publishing topics from Klipper

It is possible to publish a topic from a Klipper gcode macro with the publish_mqtt_topic remote method. For example:

# printer.cfg

[gcode_macro PUBLISH_ALERT]
gcode:
  {% set data = params.PAYLOAD|default(None) %}
  {action_call_remote_method("publish_mqtt_topic",
                             topic="klipper/alert",
                             payload=data,
                             qos=0,
                             retain=False,
                             use_prefix=True)}

The topic is required, all other parameters are optional. Below is a brief explanation of each parameter:

  • topic: a valid mqtt topic
  • payload: Defaults to an empty payload. This can be set to string, integer, float, boolean, any json object (dict or list) or None. The default value is None, in which no payload will be sent with the topic
  • qos: an integer value in the range from 0 to 2. The default is the qos set in the configuration.
  • retain: When set to True the retain flag will be set with the published topic. Defaults to False.
  • use_prefix: When set to True the configured instance_name will be prefixed to the topic. For example, if the instance_name is my_printer and the topic is klipper/alert the published topic will be my_printer/klipper/alert. The default is False.

[wled]

Enables control of a WLED strip. Moonraker always supports 4 color channel strips - the color order is defined within WLED itself.

# moonraker.conf

[wled strip_name]
type:
#   The type of device. Can be either http, or serial.
#   This parameter must be provided.
address:
#   The address should be a valid ip or hostname for the wled webserver.
#   Required when type: http
serial:
#   The serial port to be used to communicate directly to wled. Requires wled
#   0.13 Build 2108250 or later.
#   Required when type: serial
initial_preset:
#   Initial preset ID (favourite) to use. If not specified initial_colors
#   will be used instead.
initial_red:
initial_green:
initial_blue:
initial_white:
#   Initial colors to use for all neopixels should initial_preset not be set,
#   initial_white will only be used for RGBW wled strips (defaults: 0.5)
chain_count:
#   Number of addressable neopixels for use (default: 1)
color_order:
#   *** DEPRECATED - Color order is defined per GPIO in WLED directly ***
#   Color order for WLED strip, RGB or RGBW (default: RGB)
Below are some examples:
# moonraker.conf

[wled case]
type: http
address: led1.lan
initial_preset: 45
chain_count: 76

[wled lounge]
type: http
address: 192.168.0.45
initial_red: 0.5
initial_green: 0.4
initial_blue: 0.3
chain_count: 42

[wled stealthburner]
type: serial
serial: /dev/serial/by-id/usb-1a86_USB_Serial-if00-port0
initial_white: 0.6
chain_count: 3

It is possible to control wled from the klippy host, this can be done using one or more macros, such as:

# printer.cfg

[gcode_macro WLED_ON]
description: Turn WLED strip on using optional preset and resets led colors
gcode:
  {% set strip = params.STRIP|string %}
  {% set preset = params.PRESET|default(-1)|int %}

  {action_call_remote_method("set_wled_state",
                             strip=strip,
                             state=True,
                             preset=preset)}

[gcode_macro WLED_CONTROL]
description: Control effect values and brightness
gcode:
  {% set strip = params.STRIP|default('lights')|string %}
  {% set brightness = params.BRIGHTNESS|default(-1)|int %}
  {% set intensity = params.INTENSITY|default(-1)|int %}
  {% set speed = params.SPEED|default(-1)|int %}

  {action_call_remote_method("set_wled_state",
                             strip=strip,
                             brightness=brightness,
                             intensity=intensity,
                             speed=speed)}

[gcode_macro WLED_OFF]
description: Turn WLED strip off
gcode:
  {% set strip = params.STRIP|string %}

  {action_call_remote_method("set_wled_state",
                             strip=strip,
                             state=False)}

[gcode_macro SET_WLED]
description: SET_LED like functionality for WLED, applies to all active segments
gcode:
    {% set strip = params.STRIP|string %}
    {% set red = params.RED|default(0)|float %}
    {% set green = params.GREEN|default(0)|float %}
    {% set blue = params.BLUE|default(0)|float %}
    {% set white = params.WHITE|default(0)|float %}
    {% set index = params.INDEX|default(-1)|int %}
    {% set transmit = params.TRANSMIT|default(1)|int %}

    {action_call_remote_method("set_wled",
                               strip=strip,
                               red=red, green=green, blue=blue, white=white,
                               index=index, transmit=transmit)}

[zeroconf]

Enable Zeroconf service registration allowing external services to more easily detect and use Moonraker instances.

# moonraker.conf

[zeroconf]

[button]

Enables support for handling button events.

# moonraker.conf

[button my_button]
type: gpio
#   Reserved for future use.  Currently the only button type available is
#   'gpio', which is the default.
pin: gpiochip0/gpio26
#   The gpio pin to watch for button events.  The chip is optional, if
#   omitted then the module will default to gpiochip0.  The pin may be
#   inverted by specifying a "!" may be prefix.  Valid examples:
#      gpiochip0/gpio26
#      gpio26
#      !gpiochip0/gpio26
#      !gpio26
#   Systems with libgpiod 1.5 or greater installed also support pullup and
#   pulldown modes.  Prefix a "^" to enable the internal pullup and a "~" to
#   enable the internal pulldown:
#      ^gpiochip0/gpio26
#      ^gpio26
#      ~gpiochip0/gpio26
#      ~gpio26
#      # Its also possible to invert a pin with the pullup/pulldown enabled
#      ^!gpiochip0/gpio26
#      ~!gpiochip0/gpio26
#   This parameter must be provided
min_event_time: .05
#   The minimum time (in seconds) between events to trigger a response.  This is
#   is used to debounce buttons.  This value must be at least .01 seconds.
#   The default is .05 seconds (50 milliseconds).
on_press:
on_release:
#   Jinja2 templates to be executed when a button event is detected.  At least one
#   must be provided.

Button Templates

Both the on_press and on_release templates are provided a context with the with two methods that may be called in addition to Jinja2's default filters adn methods:

  • call_method: Calls an internal API method. See the API documentation for details.
  • send_notification: Emits a websocket notification. This is useful if you wish to use buttons to notify attached clients of some action. This method takes an optional argument that may contain any JSON object. If provided, this value will be sent as part of the payload with the notification.

Additionally, the following context variables are available:

  • event: This is a dictionary with details about the event:
    • elapsed_time: The time elapsed (in seconds) since the last detected button event
    • received_time: The time the event was detected according to asyncio's monotonic clock. Note that this is not in "unix time".
    • render_time: The time the template was rendered (began execution) according to asyncio's monotonic clock. It is possible execution of an event may be delayed well beyond the received_time.
    • pressed: A boolean value to indicate if the button is currently pressed.
  • user_data: This is a dictionary in which templates can store information that will persist across events. This may be useful to track the number of events, specific timing of events, return values from previous API calls, etc. Note that the data in this field does not persist across Moonraker restarts.

Warning

It is recommended to avoid API calls that may block (ie: the update APIs). Only one event may be rendered at a time, subsequent events received will be delayed. Calling a blocking API would effectively make the button non-responsive until the API call returns.

Button Template Examples:

# moonraker.conf

# Emergency Stop Example
[button estop]
type: gpio
pin: gpio26
on_press:
  # Executes immediately after a press is detected
  {% do call_method("printer.emergency_stop") %}

# Reboot Long Press Example
[button reboot]
type: gpio
pin: gpio26
on_release:
  # Only call reboot if the button was held for more than 1 second.
  # Note that this won't execute until the button has been released.
  {% if event.elapsed_time > 1.0 %}
    {% do call_method("machine.reboot") %}
  {% endif %}

# Double Click Notification Example
[button notify_btn]
type: gpio
pin: gpio26
on_press:
  # Use the "user_data" context variable to track a single click
  {% set clicked = user_data.clicked|default(false) %}
  # It isn't possible to assign a value to a context variable in Jinja2,
  # however since user_data is a dict we can call its methods.  The
  # call to __setitem__ below is equivalent to:
  #   user_data["clicked"] = true
  {% do user_data.__setitem__("clicked", true) %}
  {% if event.elapsed_time < 0.5 and clicked %}
    # We will consider this a double click if the second click occurs
    # within .5 seconds of releasing the first
    {% do user_data.__setitem__("clicked", false) %}
    {% do user_data.__setitem__("double_clicked", true) %}
  {% endif %}
on_release:
  {% set double_clicked = user_data.double_clicked|default(false) %}
  {% if double_clicked %}
    {% do user_data.__setitem__("double_clicked", false) %}
    {% do send_notification("Double Clicked!") %}
  {% endif %}

[secrets]

Retrieves credentials and other information from a "secrets" file separate from moonraker.conf. This allows users to safely distribute their configuration and log files without revealing credentials and other sensitive information.

# moonraker.conf

[secrets]
secrets_path:
#   A valid path to the "secrets" file.  A secrets file should either be
#   in "ini" format (ie: the same format as moonraker.conf) or "json"
#   format.  If the file is a "json" file, the top level item must be
#   an Object.  When this parameter is not specified no file will be
#   loaded.

Warning

For maximum security the secrets file should be located in a folder not served by Moonraker.

Example ini file:

# moonraker_secrets.ini

[mqtt_credentials]
username: mqtt_user
password: my_mqtt_password

[home_assistant]
token: long_token_string

Example json file:

{
    "mqtt_credentials": {
        "username": "mqtt_user",
        "password": "my_mqtt_password"
    },
    "home_assistant": {
      "token": "long_token_string"
    }
}

Tip

Generally speaking ini files are easier to manually edit. However, options are limited to string values without parsing and converting. The strength of json is that a field may be an integer, string, float, boolean, array, or object.

Accessing secret credentials

The secrets object is added to Moonraker's Jinja2 environment as a global, thus it is available in all templates. All options in Moonraker's configuration that accept credentials support templates.

MQTT configuration example with secret credentials:

[mqtt]
address: mqtt-broker.local
port: 1883
# The username and password options below may be templates that
# we can use to resolve stored secrets
username: {secrets.mqtt_credentials.username}
password: {secrets.mqtt_credentials.password}
enable_moonraker_api: True

Warning

The purpose of the [secrets] module is to keep credentials and other sensitive information out of configuration files and Moonraker's log. These items are stored in plain text, it is wise to use unique credentials. Never leave a Moonraker client application open unattended in an untrusted location, as it would be possible for a malicious actor to reconfigure moonraker to send items stored in the secrets file to themselves via mqtt, notifier, etc.

Home Assistant Switch Example:

# moonraker.conf

[power homeassistant_switch]
type: homeassistant
address: home-assistant-host.local
port: 8123
device: switch.1234567890abcdefghij
# The token option may be a template
token: {secrets.home_assistant.token}
domain: switch

[notifier]

Enables the notification service. Multiple "notifiers" may be configured, each with their own section, ie: [notifier my_discord_server], [notifier my_phone].

All notifiers require an url for a service to be set up. Moonraker uses Apprise internally. You can find the available services and their corresponding urls here: https://github.com/caronc/apprise/wiki.

# moonraker.conf

[notifier telegram]
url: tgram://{bottoken}/{ChatID}
#   The url for your notifier. This URL accepts Jinja2 templates, so you can use [secrets] if you want.
events: *
#   The events this notifier should trigger to. '*' means all events.
#   You can use multiple events, comma separated.
#   Valid events:
#      started
#      complete
#      error
#      cancelled
#      paused
#      resumed
body: "Your printer status has changed to {event_name}"
#   The body of the notification. This option accepts Jinja2 templates.
#   You can use {event_name} to print the current event trigger name. And {event_args} for
#   the arguments that came with it.
title:
#   The optional title of the notification. Just as the body, this option accepts Jinja2 templates.
attach:
#   An optional attachment. Can be an url of a webcam for example. Note: this isn't available for all
#   notification services. You can check if it's supported on the Apprise Wiki. Be aware that links in
#   your internal network can only be viewed within your network.

An example:

# moonraker.conf

[notifier print_start]
url: tgram://{bottoken}/{ChatID}
events: started
body: Your printer started printing '{event_args[1].filename}'

[notifier print_complete]
url: tgram://{bottoken}/{ChatID}
events: complete
body: Your printer completed printing '{event_args[1].filename}'
attach: http://192.168.1.100/webcam/?action=snapshot

[notifier print_error]
url: tgram://{bottoken}/{ChatID}
events: error
body: {event_args[1].message}
attach: http://192.168.1.100/webcam/?action=snapshot

[simplyprint]

Note

Currently the SimplyPrint service is only available for developers and testers. When the service is available for end users this note will be removed.

Enables support for print monitoring through SimplyPrint.

# moonraker.conf
[simplyprint]
webcam_name:
#   Optional name of a configured webcam for use by the SimplyPrint service.
#   This can either be a webcam configured through the `[webcam]` module or
#   a webcam added via a front-end like Mainsail.  The default is to attempt
#   to autodetect a webcam.
power_device:
#   The name of a configured [power] device available to toggle over using
#   the SimplyPrint service.  For example, to toggle a device configured
#   as `[power printer]` this may be configured as:
#       power_device: printer
#   By default no power device is configured.
filament_sensor:
#   The full name of a configured filament sensor to be monitored by
#   SimplyPrint.  The filament sensor must be configured in Klipper and
#   the full name, including the prefix, must be specified.  For example,
#   to monitor a sensor configured as `[filament_switch_sensor fsensor],
#   this may be configured as:
#       filament_sensor:  filament_switch_sensor fsensor
#   By default no filament sensor is monitored.

Note

This module collects and uploads the following data to SimplyPrint:

  • Klipper's version, connection state, and date pulled
  • Moonraker's version
  • Currenly connected front-end and version
  • Current python version
  • Linux distribution and version
  • Network connection type (wifi or ethernet)
  • wifi SSID (if connected)
  • LAN IP address
  • LAN hostname
  • CPU model
  • CPU core count
  • Total system memory
  • CPU usage
  • Memory usage
  • Current extruder selected
  • Extruder and bed temperatures
  • Mesh data (if Klipper has bed_mesh configured)
  • Current print state
  • Loaded file metadata, including estimated filament usage and print time
  • Current print filament usage
  • Current print time elapse
  • Estimated ambient temperature
  • Webcam configuration (if available)
  • Webcam images. These images are also sent to printpal.io
  • Power device state (if configured)
  • Filament sensor state (if configured)

Include directives

It is possible to include configuration from other files via include directives. Include directives in Moonraker are specified identically to those in Klipper, ie: [include relative_path]. The relative_path is a path relative to the configuration file's parent folder, and may include wildcards. For example:

# moonraker.conf

[include my_extra_config.conf]

[include subfolder/*.conf]

If a section is duplicated in an included file the options from both sections will be merged, with the latest section parsed taking precedence. The order in which a section is parsed depends on the location of the include directive. When wildcards are specified all matches are parsed in alphabetical order.

Jinja2 Templates

Some Moonraker configuration options make use of Jinja2 Templates. For consistency, Moonraker uses the same Jinja2 syntax as Klipper. Statements should be enclosed in {% %}, and expressions in { }. There are some key differences, as outlined below:

  • Moonraker templates do not currently include globals like printer and params in the context. Variables included in the context will be specified in the option's documentation.
  • Moonraker's template environment adds the ext.do extension. The {% do expression %} statement can be used to modify variables without printing any text. See the example below for details.
  • Klipper uses Jinja2 exclusively for evaluating gcode statements. Moonraker uses it to provide configuration options that may need to change based on runtime parameters.

For an example of how to use the do statement, lets assume we need to send a specific json payload with an MQTT power device command. Rather than attempt to type out the json ourselves, it may be easier to create a dictionary object and convert it to json:

# moonraker.conf

[power my_mqtt_device]
type: mqtt
command_topic: my/mqtt/command
# Lets assume this device requires a json payload with each command.
# We will use a dict to generate the payload
command_payload:
  {% set my_payload = {"SOME_FIELD": ""} %}
  # example of calling the dict.update method
  {% do my_payload.update({"SOME_FIELD": "a string value"}) %}
  # Here we set the actual command, the "command" variable
  # is passed to the context of this template
  {% do my_payload.__setitem__("POWER_COMMAND", command) %}
  # generate the json output
  { my_payload|tojson }

Option Moved Deprecations

On November 7th 2021 a change to Moonraker was made regarding configuration of core components. Moonraker defines a core component as a component that is required for Moonraker to function and is always loaded. Prior to November 7th all core components were configured in the [server] section. As Moonraker's functionality expanded, this became untenable as the [server] section began to bloat. Thus a change was made to move the configuration for core components out of [server] into their own sections. This was not a breaking change, Moonraker would fall back to the [server] section for core component configuration if no section was present.

On April 6th 2022 the fallback was deprecated. Moonraker will still function normally if core components are configured in the [server] section, however Moonraker now generates warnings when it detected this condition, such as:

[server]: Option 'config_path' has been moved to section [file_manager]. Please correct your configuration, see https://moonraker.readthedocs.io/en/latest/configuration for detailed documentation.
[server]: Option 'log_path' has been moved to section [file_manager]. Please correct your configuration, see https://moonraker.readthedocs.io/en/latest/configuration for detailed documentation.
[server]: Option 'temperature_store_size' has been moved to section [data_store]. Please correct your configuration, see https://moonraker.readthedocs.io/en/latest/configuration for detailed documentation.
[server]: Option 'gcode_store_size' has been moved to section [data_store]. Please correct your configuration, see https://moonraker.readthedocs.io/en/latest/configuration for detailed documentation

To correct these warnings, the user must modify moonraker.conf. For example, your current configuration may look like the following:

# moonraker.conf

[server]
host: 0.0.0.0
port: 7125
temperature_store_size: 600
gcode_store_size: 1000
config_path: ~/klipper_config
log_path: ~/klipper_logs

You will need to change it to the following;

# moonraker.conf

[server]
host: 0.0.0.0
port: 7125

[file_manager]
config_path: ~/klipper_config
log_path: ~/klipper_logs

[data_store]
temperature_store_size: 600
gcode_store_size: 1000

The common front-ends provide a UI for modifying moonraker.conf, otherwise it will be necessary to ssh into the host and use a tool such as nano to make the changes.

Warning

Make sure moonraker.conf does not have duplicate sections, and double check to make sure that the formatting is correct.

Once the changes are complete you may use the UI to restart Moonraker and the warnings should clear.

Note

Some users have asked why Moonraker does not automate these changes. Currently Moonraker has no mechanism to modify the configuration directly, however this functionality will be added in the future.